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7 Notes

Film 007′s upcoming 50th anniversary: what was going on in 1962, anyway?

Quite a lot, as it turns out.

Next year is the golden anniversary of the first 007 film, Dr. No, and Variety has reported that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is “working up plans for a 2012 yearlong commemoration.” That got us to thinking about what was going on in the world in 1962, which quite a newsy year in a variety of ways.

Here are some examples of well-known, and lesser-known, events that year:

Jan. 15: NBC airs “La Strega” episode of Thriller, starring Ursula Andress, female lead of Dr. No, which will be the first James Bond film.

Jan 16: Production begins on Dr. No, modestly budgeted at about $1 million. Fees include $40,000 for director Terence Young and $80,000 each for producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, not counting their share of profits. (Figures from resarch by film historian Adrian Turner). Star Sean Connery tells Playboy magazine in 1965 that he was paid $16,800 for Dr. No.

Inside Dr. No, a documentary made by John Cork for a DVD release of the movie, says about 10 percent of the film’s budget went to the Ken Adam-designed reactor room set, where the climatic fight between Bond and Dr. No takes place. (Date of production start from research by Craig Henderson’s For Your Eyes Only Web site.

Jan. 17: Jim Carrey is born.

Feb 3: U.S. begins embargo against Cuba.

Feb. 20: John Glenn becomes first U.S. astronaut to orbit the Earth.

March 2: Wilt Chamberlain scores 100 points as his Philadelphia Warriors team defeats the New York Knicks 169-147 in a game played in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Chamberlain achieves the feat by scoring 36 baskets and, perhaps most amazingly, by hitting 28 of 32 free-throw attempts. (Chamberlain was a notoriously bad free-throw shooter.) The player averaged 50.4 points per game in the 1961-62 season.

April 16: The Spy Who Loved Me, Ian Fleming’s latest 007 novel, is published. The novel takes a radical departure from previous Bond novels. The story is told in the first person by a female character, Vivienne Michel, with Bond not appearing until two-thirds of the way through the story. Fleming, in his dealings with Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, specifies only the title is to be used for any movie. Broccoli (after Saltzman departs the film series) does just that in the 10th film of the 007 series, which comes out in July 1977.

May (publication date, actual likely earlier): The Incredible Hulk, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, debuts in the first issue of his own comic book.

June 1: Nazi Adolph Eichmann executed in Israel.

July 3: Future Mission: Impossible movie star Tom Cruise is born.

July 12: Rolling Stones debut in London.

August (publication date actual date probably earlier): Amazing Fantasy No. 15 published, debut of Spider-Man by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, with cover by Jack Kirby and Ditko.

Aug. 5: Actress Marilyn Monroe dies.

Aug. 6: Michelle Yeoh, who will play Chinese secret agent Wai Lin in the 1997 Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies, is born.

Aug. 16: Future Get Smart movie star Steve Carell is born.

Aug. 16: Ringo Starr joins the Beatles.

Sept. 26: The Beverly Hillbillies debuts on CBS. In a later season, Jethro sees Goldfinger in a movie theater and decides that being a “Double-Naught” spy is his life’s calling.

Oct. 1: Federal marshals escort James Meredith, first African American student at the University of Missippi, as he registers at the school.

Oct. 1: Johnny Carson, a few weeks short of his 37th birthday, hosts his first installment of The Tonight Show. He will remain as host until May 1992. At one point during Carson’s run on the show, he and Sean Connery reference how Carson’s debut on Tonight and Connery’s debut as Bond occurred at around the same time.

Oct. 5: Dr. No has its world premier in London. The film won’t be shown in the U.S. until the following year.

Oct. 14: A U.S. U-2 spy plane discovers missile sites in Cuba, beginning the Cuban Missile Crisis. The crisis will bring the U.S. and Soviet Union to the brink of World War III.

Oct. 22: President John F. Kennedy makes a televised address, publicly revealing the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba.

Oct. 28: Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev announces the U.S.S.R. is removing its missiles from Cuba. (for a more detailed timeline of these events, CLICK HERE.)

Oct. 29: Ian Fleming begins three days of meetings with television producer Norman Felton concerning a show that will eventually be known as The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (source: Craig Henderson) Fleming’s main contribution of the meetings is that the hero should be named Napoleon Solo.

Nov. 7: Richard Nixon loses race for governor of California, tells reporters “you won’t have Dick Nixon to kick around anymore.” He’ll be back.

Dec. 10: The David Lean-directed Lawrence of Arabia has its world premiere in London. The film’s crew include director of photography Freddie Young and camera operator Ernest Day, who will work on future James Bond movies. Young will photograph 1967′s You Only Live Twice. Day would be second unit director (with John Glen) on The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker.

For a more comprehensive list of significant 1962 events, CLICK HERE.

Filed in 1962 dr. no james bond stories behind

3 Notes

fuckyeahdoubleohseven:

James Bond: Now, don’t worry, Quarrel. Everything’s going to be fine.
Quarrel: You say so, Captain. Bottom part of where my belly used to be tells me different.
James Bond: For me, Crab Key’s going to be a gentle relaxation.
Felix Leiter: From what? Dames?
James Bond: No, from being a clay pigeon.

Filed in james bond 1962 dr. no quarrel quotes

3 Notes

Miss Taro - The Character in the Movie

In the 1962 James Bond movie Dr. No, Miss Taro worked as a  secretary for Pleydell-Smith at Government house in Kingston, Jamaica.  She also worked for Dr. No and  reported to him that James Bond was coming over to investigate the death  of John  Strangways, the head of station in Jamaica. Bond was the only one  who realized her connection with Dr. No and he even caught her spying on  a conversation through a keyhole.
Miss Taro invited Bond to her house for dinner, something that didn’t  happen in the novel. It was,  of course,  a trap and three of Dr. No’s  henchmen came after bond in a hearse. Bond managed to loose them,  sending them flying down a cliff, and drove on to Miss Taro’s house. She  was surprised to see him and soon after got a call from another of Dr.  No’s henchmen Professor  Dent. Miss Taro said that Bond was there and she was told to keep  him there so he could be assassinated later on.
She kept Bond there and said she would make a Chinese. Bond lied,  saying he fancied something else and that he would call a cab. He had  actually called Government House and when Miss Taro got in the car, she  realized she was being arrested and spat in Bond’s face. Bond stayed to  wait for Professor Dent and Miss Taro was presumably sent to jail or to  be interrogated.

The Character in the Book

Miss Taro is a fictional character who appeared in Ian Fleming’s  novel Dr. No, published in 1958. She was a Chinese woman who  worked in Jamaica as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith, who in turn worked  for the British Secret Service as Principal Secretary at Government  House in Kingston, Jamaica.
Off the coast of Jamaica was a small island named Crab Key. It was  owned by Dr. No, who was using a powerful radio beam to takeover the  guidance systems of USA test missiles so he could crash land them. Miss  Taro reported back any information that may concern him or his island.  She looked through Bond’s file and reported that a British Spy was  coming to Investigate. Bond discovered this when he found his folder  open on her desk. She also stole the files on Crab Key to deter anyone  from investigating. Unlike the movie, Miss Taro doesn’t appear again  after Bond’s meeting with Pleydell-Smith.

from Miss Taro @ 007 James

Miss Taro - The Character in the Movie

In the 1962 James Bond movie Dr. No, Miss Taro worked as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith at Government house in Kingston, Jamaica. She also worked for Dr. No and reported to him that James Bond was coming over to investigate the death of John Strangways, the head of station in Jamaica. Bond was the only one who realized her connection with Dr. No and he even caught her spying on a conversation through a keyhole.

Miss Taro invited Bond to her house for dinner, something that didn’t happen in the novel. It was, of course, a trap and three of Dr. No’s henchmen came after bond in a hearse. Bond managed to loose them, sending them flying down a cliff, and drove on to Miss Taro’s house. She was surprised to see him and soon after got a call from another of Dr. No’s henchmen Professor Dent. Miss Taro said that Bond was there and she was told to keep him there so he could be assassinated later on.

She kept Bond there and said she would make a Chinese. Bond lied, saying he fancied something else and that he would call a cab. He had actually called Government House and when Miss Taro got in the car, she realized she was being arrested and spat in Bond’s face. Bond stayed to wait for Professor Dent and Miss Taro was presumably sent to jail or to be interrogated.

The Character in the Book

Miss Taro is a fictional character who appeared in Ian Fleming’s novel Dr. No, published in 1958. She was a Chinese woman who worked in Jamaica as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith, who in turn worked for the British Secret Service as Principal Secretary at Government House in Kingston, Jamaica.

Off the coast of Jamaica was a small island named Crab Key. It was owned by Dr. No, who was using a powerful radio beam to takeover the guidance systems of USA test missiles so he could crash land them. Miss Taro reported back any information that may concern him or his island. She looked through Bond’s file and reported that a British Spy was coming to Investigate. Bond discovered this when he found his folder open on her desk. She also stole the files on Crab Key to deter anyone from investigating. Unlike the movie, Miss Taro doesn’t appear again after Bond’s meeting with Pleydell-Smith.

from Miss Taro @ 007 James

Filed in miss taro zena marshall dr. no 1962 sean connery differencies villains

4 Notes

Zena Marshall (1925-2009)

Her exotic looks resulted in her being cast in “ethnic” roles, such as Asian  women, including her role as the Chinese  character Miss Taro, in the first James  Bond film, Dr. No (1962).

from her Wiki page

Marshall shot to fame in the role of Chinese SPECTRE  agent                       Miss Taro in the debut James Bond film “Dr                       No” in October 1962. Although it took a couple                       of years for worldwide audiences to catch on to  the 007                       phenomenon (the film was not released in the USA  until                       May 1963), and thanks to re-releases of the early  films                       when Bondmania struck with “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball”,                       Marshall’s scenes with Sean                       Connery became part of cinema history.  Although not                       the first conquest for Bond, Miss Taro was the  first ‘bad                   girl’ of the series.
Contributing to a DVD commentary many years later, Marshall                 made it clear that she thought the “Dr No” script was  nothing                 special till director Terence Young introduced an  element of                 humour.                 She also remembered that it took three days to shoot her  landmark                 bedroom scene with Connery and that she found it very  difficult               to spit in his face when handed over to the police.

from Miss Taro’s profile @ MI6
// Zena Marshall's profile @ IMDb

Zena Marshall (1925-2009)

Her exotic looks resulted in her being cast in “ethnic” roles, such as Asian women, including her role as the Chinese character Miss Taro, in the first James Bond film, Dr. No (1962).

from her Wiki page

Marshall shot to fame in the role of Chinese SPECTRE agent Miss Taro in the debut James Bond film “Dr No” in October 1962. Although it took a couple of years for worldwide audiences to catch on to the 007 phenomenon (the film was not released in the USA until May 1963), and thanks to re-releases of the early films when Bondmania struck with “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball”, Marshall’s scenes with Sean Connery became part of cinema history. Although not the first conquest for Bond, Miss Taro was the first ‘bad girl’ of the series.

Contributing to a DVD commentary many years later, Marshall made it clear that she thought the “Dr No” script was nothing special till director Terence Young introduced an element of humour. She also remembered that it took three days to shoot her landmark bedroom scene with Connery and that she found it very difficult to spit in his face when handed over to the police.

from Miss Taro’s profile @ MI6

// Zena Marshall's profile @ IMDb

Filed in dr. no james bond 1962 zena marshall miss taro villains

1 Notes

Tech Infos of Dr. No

  • MPAA Rating: Approved
  • US Runtime: 110 min
  • Premiere Date: 07 Oct 1962 [UK] at the London Pavilion, Piccadilly Circus, London.
  • Budget: $950,000 (USA)
  • Worldwide Box Office: $59.5 million
  • Color Info: Color (Technicolor)
  • Cinematographic Process: Spherical
  • Laboratory: Technicolor
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85 : 1
  • Film Negative Format: 35 mm
  • Printed Film Format: 35 mm
  • Shooting Dates: 16 Jan 1962 - Mar 1962

from Britannia Film Archives

Filed in dr. no 1962 james bond tech infos

7 Notes

mangoprojects:

JAMES BOND DR. NO
Behind the Scenes: Dr. No Part 1 
From MGM, a documentary of an inside look at Ian Fleming’s Dr. No. This part one of four series narrated by Patrick Macnee takes viewers on a journery of the history of Ian Fleming’s James Bond.

Ian Fleming’s Dr. No was written by Ian Fleming, Richard Maibaum, Johanna Harwood, Berkely Mather and Terence Young. Dr. No was directed by Terence Young and starring Sean Connery as Mr. James Bond, Ursula Andress, Jack Lord, Bernard Lee and Joseph Wiseman as Dr. No..permalink

BehindCurtain1

Filed in james bond dr. no 1962 stories behind terence young video

2 Notes


At the Queen’s Club 1, a game of bridge  is at hand  between General Potter (Colonel Burton), British agent John Strangways  (Tim Moxon), Professor Dent 2 (Anthony Dawson) 3,  and Pleydell-Smith (Louis Blaazer), Jamaica’s Principal Secretary of  the British Foreign Service.
1 Portrayed by the Liguanea Club, located at 80   Knutsford Boulevard in Kingston, Jamaica. 2 There’s no mention of Professor Dent in Ian  Fleming’s novel, although there is an unnamed Mathematics Professor in  Strangways’ foursome. 3 In the films “From Russia With Love” (1963) and  “Thunderball” (1965), Anthony Dawson portrays SPECTRE #1, Ernst Stavro  Blofeld, from the neck down. Starting with “You Only Live Twice” (1967),  Blofeld would play a more central role to the plot and would be  portrayed in full by various actors. 4 As Strangways, Tim Moxon’s voice is dubbed over by  actor Robert Rietty, who also dubbed over Adolfo Celi’s voice as Emilio  Largo in “Thunderball” (1965). 5 In Ian Fleming’s novel, Strangways wears a black  patch over his right eye. In the literary canon, Strangways also made an  appearance in the second Bond novel “Live and Let Die” (1954).

from Movie Notes: Dr. No

At the Queen’s Club 1, a game of bridge is at hand between General Potter (Colonel Burton), British agent John Strangways (Tim Moxon), Professor Dent 2 (Anthony Dawson) 3, and Pleydell-Smith (Louis Blaazer), Jamaica’s Principal Secretary of the British Foreign Service.

1 Portrayed by the Liguanea Club, located at 80 Knutsford Boulevard in Kingston, Jamaica.

2 There’s no mention of Professor Dent in Ian Fleming’s novel, although there is an unnamed Mathematics Professor in Strangways’ foursome.

3 In the films “From Russia With Love” (1963) and “Thunderball” (1965), Anthony Dawson portrays SPECTRE #1, Ernst Stavro Blofeld, from the neck down. Starting with “You Only Live Twice” (1967), Blofeld would play a more central role to the plot and would be portrayed in full by various actors.

4 As Strangways, Tim Moxon’s voice is dubbed over by actor Robert Rietty, who also dubbed over Adolfo Celi’s voice as Emilio Largo in “Thunderball” (1965).

5 In Ian Fleming’s novel, Strangways wears a black patch over his right eye. In the literary canon, Strangways also made an appearance in the second Bond novel “Live and Let Die” (1954).

from Movie Notes: Dr. No

Filed in 1962 SPECTRE anthony dawson colonel burton dr. no from russia with love general potter james bond live and let die louis blazer pleydell-smith professor dent queens club strangways thunderball tim moxon you only live twice differences

2 Notes

Signage of Professor Dent for geological analysis
from James Bond Logos in Dr. No

This item was recovered from Strangways house by 007  in Dr No when he visits it, to investigate his disappearance. You see it  sitting on a side wall unit, 007 picks it up and takes it to Dent who  checked samples for Strangways. The receipt shows Dents verdict on the  presumed radioactive samples. Professor Dent’s Queens Club Card, items  such as this membership card are made to make the film environment  realistic.

from The Quartermaster’s Sean Connery Bond Props

A slimy geologist in the pay of Dr. No and SPECTRE, Dent is tasked with  killing James Bond, but on several occasions he is thwarted by the 00 Agent. Dent  proves a useful resource on the mainland acting as informer and assassin for  Dr. No. He puts on the façade of a rich gentleman, seeing out his later-life in the tropical Jamaican isles. He is a member of the elitist Queens  Club and a card partner of MI6 Agent John Strangways. In fact, Dent is one of the  last men to see Strangways alive.

from Professor Dent’s profile @ MI6

Signage of Professor Dent for geological analysis

from James Bond Logos in Dr. No

This item was recovered from Strangways house by 007 in Dr No when he visits it, to investigate his disappearance. You see it sitting on a side wall unit, 007 picks it up and takes it to Dent who checked samples for Strangways. The receipt shows Dents verdict on the presumed radioactive samples. Professor Dent’s Queens Club Card, items such as this membership card are made to make the film environment realistic.

from The Quartermaster’s Sean Connery Bond Props

A slimy geologist in the pay of Dr. No and SPECTRE, Dent is tasked with killing James Bond, but on several occasions he is thwarted by the 00 Agent. Dent proves a useful resource on the mainland acting as informer and assassin for Dr. No. He puts on the façade of a rich gentleman, seeing out his later-life in the tropical Jamaican isles. He is a member of the elitist Queens Club and a card partner of MI6 Agent John Strangways. In fact, Dent is one of the last men to see Strangways alive.

from Professor Dent’s profile @ MI6

Filed in 1962 SPECTRE dr. no james bond professor dent strangways