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15 Notes

Forget the Film, Watch the Titles! Dr. No



When you see a man in a tuxedo holding a gun, you immediately identify him as James Bond. When you see the first few seconds of the gun barrel sequence, you know that a Bond movie is about to start. Sexy silhouettes? John Barry's 007 Theme? Bond! It was Maurice Binder who designed the titles for the first Bond movie Dr. No in 1962, creating all the visual elements that became iconic for the Bond universe. Liselotte Doeswijk takes an in-depth look at the Bond title sequence that had such a huge impact on the Bond franchise and on title design in general.

Forget the Film, Watch the Titles! Dr. No

When you see a man in a tuxedo holding a gun, you immediately identify him as James Bond. When you see the first few seconds of the gun barrel sequence, you know that a Bond movie is about to start. Sexy silhouettes? John Barry's 007 Theme? Bond! It was Maurice Binder who designed the titles for the first Bond movie Dr. No in 1962, creating all the visual elements that became iconic for the Bond universe. Liselotte Doeswijk takes an in-depth look at the Bond title sequence that had such a huge impact on the Bond franchise and on title design in general.

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7 Notes

Film 007′s upcoming 50th anniversary: what was going on in 1962, anyway?

Quite a lot, as it turns out.

Next year is the golden anniversary of the first 007 film, Dr. No, and Variety has reported that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is “working up plans for a 2012 yearlong commemoration.” That got us to thinking about what was going on in the world in 1962, which quite a newsy year in a variety of ways.

Here are some examples of well-known, and lesser-known, events that year:

Jan. 15: NBC airs “La Strega” episode of Thriller, starring Ursula Andress, female lead of Dr. No, which will be the first James Bond film.

Jan 16: Production begins on Dr. No, modestly budgeted at about $1 million. Fees include $40,000 for director Terence Young and $80,000 each for producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, not counting their share of profits. (Figures from resarch by film historian Adrian Turner). Star Sean Connery tells Playboy magazine in 1965 that he was paid $16,800 for Dr. No.

Inside Dr. No, a documentary made by John Cork for a DVD release of the movie, says about 10 percent of the film’s budget went to the Ken Adam-designed reactor room set, where the climatic fight between Bond and Dr. No takes place. (Date of production start from research by Craig Henderson’s For Your Eyes Only Web site.

Jan. 17: Jim Carrey is born.

Feb 3: U.S. begins embargo against Cuba.

Feb. 20: John Glenn becomes first U.S. astronaut to orbit the Earth.

March 2: Wilt Chamberlain scores 100 points as his Philadelphia Warriors team defeats the New York Knicks 169-147 in a game played in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Chamberlain achieves the feat by scoring 36 baskets and, perhaps most amazingly, by hitting 28 of 32 free-throw attempts. (Chamberlain was a notoriously bad free-throw shooter.) The player averaged 50.4 points per game in the 1961-62 season.

April 16: The Spy Who Loved Me, Ian Fleming’s latest 007 novel, is published. The novel takes a radical departure from previous Bond novels. The story is told in the first person by a female character, Vivienne Michel, with Bond not appearing until two-thirds of the way through the story. Fleming, in his dealings with Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, specifies only the title is to be used for any movie. Broccoli (after Saltzman departs the film series) does just that in the 10th film of the 007 series, which comes out in July 1977.

May (publication date, actual likely earlier): The Incredible Hulk, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, debuts in the first issue of his own comic book.

June 1: Nazi Adolph Eichmann executed in Israel.

July 3: Future Mission: Impossible movie star Tom Cruise is born.

July 12: Rolling Stones debut in London.

August (publication date actual date probably earlier): Amazing Fantasy No. 15 published, debut of Spider-Man by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, with cover by Jack Kirby and Ditko.

Aug. 5: Actress Marilyn Monroe dies.

Aug. 6: Michelle Yeoh, who will play Chinese secret agent Wai Lin in the 1997 Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies, is born.

Aug. 16: Future Get Smart movie star Steve Carell is born.

Aug. 16: Ringo Starr joins the Beatles.

Sept. 26: The Beverly Hillbillies debuts on CBS. In a later season, Jethro sees Goldfinger in a movie theater and decides that being a “Double-Naught” spy is his life’s calling.

Oct. 1: Federal marshals escort James Meredith, first African American student at the University of Missippi, as he registers at the school.

Oct. 1: Johnny Carson, a few weeks short of his 37th birthday, hosts his first installment of The Tonight Show. He will remain as host until May 1992. At one point during Carson’s run on the show, he and Sean Connery reference how Carson’s debut on Tonight and Connery’s debut as Bond occurred at around the same time.

Oct. 5: Dr. No has its world premier in London. The film won’t be shown in the U.S. until the following year.

Oct. 14: A U.S. U-2 spy plane discovers missile sites in Cuba, beginning the Cuban Missile Crisis. The crisis will bring the U.S. and Soviet Union to the brink of World War III.

Oct. 22: President John F. Kennedy makes a televised address, publicly revealing the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba.

Oct. 28: Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev announces the U.S.S.R. is removing its missiles from Cuba. (for a more detailed timeline of these events, CLICK HERE.)

Oct. 29: Ian Fleming begins three days of meetings with television producer Norman Felton concerning a show that will eventually be known as The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (source: Craig Henderson) Fleming’s main contribution of the meetings is that the hero should be named Napoleon Solo.

Nov. 7: Richard Nixon loses race for governor of California, tells reporters “you won’t have Dick Nixon to kick around anymore.” He’ll be back.

Dec. 10: The David Lean-directed Lawrence of Arabia has its world premiere in London. The film’s crew include director of photography Freddie Young and camera operator Ernest Day, who will work on future James Bond movies. Young will photograph 1967′s You Only Live Twice. Day would be second unit director (with John Glen) on The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker.

For a more comprehensive list of significant 1962 events, CLICK HERE.

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4 Notes

Dr. No: Live Blog

jamesbondliveblog:

Welcome to my first live blog event. We’re kicking this sucker off with the first Bond film ever made and possible one of the lesser watched of the twenty plus film franchise. This was back when Bond was still a regular spy and not a super spy. But enough chit chat. Let get going. 
 
0:00:32 Ah the first barrel shot. It hasn’t changed since and for good reason. It perfectly sums up everything Bond is. It’s just the jump across the barrel that the stunt man does is fucking histerical and stupid. 
 
0:01:45 The opening sequence is weird. It jumps from poka dots to jamician dancing to three blind mice. it’s just disoreinting.   
 
0:3:32 I love how british these guys are. they have every stereotype in the book within seconds. THEY’RE SO FUCKING BRITISH. 
  
0:04:34 lol bookcase radio. it’s high tech 
 
0:05:20 Why have all the bad guys been black so far? 
   
0:06:20 What’s great about Dr. No is that it’s actually set up to be a mystery thriller and not an action film that it become later.  
  
0:07:30 I’m geniuely surprised that they don’t show Bond’s face from the start and hide him. It creates a cool mystic around him making the first lines Bond says in the entire franchise all that more meaning ful.  
 
0:08:20 First use of inappropiate theme song. He’s not even in an intense game. 
 
0:9:15 “Amongst other things” she couldn’t possibly be refering to sex could she. 
 
0:09:40 Bond theme music for getting out of an elevator. You know you could slip through the cracks and kill yourself, dangerous business. 
  
0:11:45 Connerys eyebrows seem like their going to wrap around his head if he doesn’t groom them properly 
  
tech difficults just a sec 
 
0:13:40 A 40 percent drop in casualities that’s massive how many were dying before 
 
0:13:55 Fun fact 007 actually prefers the berrata over the walter ppk making it the first gadget bond ever recieved in the franchise. 
 
0:15:37 I want half naked women just waiting for me in me hotel room. Why can ‘t I have that. Damn you god. 
 
0:16:56 he’s getting out of the airport why is the theme playing. is this music just playing in bond’s head at all times. i bet he sings along too. *just reading my newspaper/gotta make a call/oh look there’s a phone/ i’m so lucky* 
  
0:18:38 He’s wearing sunglasses. that makes him sinister and mysterious. Owes knows 
 
0:19:40 the first bond car chase and bond isn’t even driving. he’s just that bad ass. He doesn’t even need to drive 
 
21:04 Bond’s kind of a dick. just flipping dudes left and right. 
 
22:10 LoL he’s dead. Get it? GET IT! 
 
23:10 did these guys not investigate at all before Bond showed up. “We obviously can’t handle this guys. Lets go home” 
 
25:17 And this is why you don’t recommend Dr. NO as the first bond film to watch. He just spent two goddamn minutes making sure no one entered his room. The bond theme wasn’t even playing. We get the song for him buying a new hat but not for actual spy stuff. 
 
27:10 ok all the bad guys so far have been black and now Quarrel shows up and he’s a coward. the sixties were so racist and in the worst kind of ways. bad guys and cowards. 
 
29:00 What Bond didn’t say there was that he loved the way Quarrel smelled. 
 
30:00 He ‘wrasltes’ aligators evidently. that is information everyone needs to know. HEY EVERYONE HE WRASTLES ALLIGATORS! 
  
31:10 I’ve always loved the felix lighter character. weofully under used.  
 
32:30 Sean Connery is just yelling at everyone at this point. It’s not necassary.  
 
34:10 the abuse going on this film is almost intollerable and Quarrel seems to be enjoying this a little too much. He fucking smiled when she cut his face, who the fuck is this guy he’s both a coward and has a bondage fetish 
 
35:50 you know the three blind mice aren’t very good assassins. it might be the blindness. 
 
37:18 these are the days when bond got his information through cunning and smarts and not betting faces in. good times good times. 
 
38:10 it only took forty minutes but we have our first bad guy who isn’t black. look at you your being progressive, your so cute. 
 
39:00 of course the evil island is filled with black and asian men 
 
39:38 God? is that you? why am i in the scary room with the chair. it scares at me. 
 
40:56 so this dude failed killing bond so instead we’re going to send this slow moving spider. Dr. No is gangsta. 
 
41:30 theme music for checking your messages *it’s so cold out/ i wonder if anyone called me/cool i have a new car* 
 
43:25 “I sense a disturbance in the force.” 
 
44:27 did we really need the music to signal every strike of the shoe. it’s not like it was a mutant spider, just a regular spider. I wonder if the spider will have to talk to god now in the scary room with the chair? 
 
46:05 more evil asians great  this movie is so god damn racist. 
 
47:40 Quarrel is the biggest fucking coward. also substute “captian” with “masta”  
 
49:16 who fucking talks on the phone like that. it can’t  be comfortable. 
 
49:50 *just enjoying a drive/it’s so sunny out/ the wind is in my hair/ i love my new car* 
 
50:30 Careful that movie screen behind you might catch up 
 
51:52 who makes towels like that? it’s like a fucking dress 
 
52:42 He’s sniffy it, why is he sniffy it. and he’s grinning. Fucking creepy 
 
53:45 So Bond is just going for the free fuck then. and the ceiling fan is a weird thing to cut to. is there some sex move called the helicopter i don’t know about? 
 
54:50 and he fucks her again. he must have a business account with viagra 
 
57:50 Bond doesn’t give a shit who you are. He’s just a dick to everyone. Asshole. Can’t a man assisnate someone in peace. 
 
59:40 Look their shooting blue for night. who ever thought that effect actually worked? 
 
1:01:00 did sean connery show up on location for anything. there’s always a goddamn rear projection screen behind him. You know the water isn’t that scary sean it’s just wet. 
 
1:02:35: the only shot from Dr. NO anyone will actually recognize. 
 
1:04:00 Honey Rider? Even in the beginning they weren’t trying to be subtle. 
 
1:06:21 Guys ammo isn’t unlimited there’s no reason to keep shooting at nothing. if no one is there than no one is fucking there you baboons. 
 
1:07:10 “That was a machine gun not a dragon” thank you James Obvious 
 
1:11:32 James Bond Alligator impersonator. Careful i hear there’s a guy around that ‘wrastles’ alligators. 
 
1:12:24 Why did she take her top off. it was a bathing suit. guys at least try and not objectivefy here. 
 
1:13:40 I kind of miss films that introduce a main character over half way through the film.  
 
1:14:26 What’s with the people in this film and spiders. Everyone uses spiders to kill each other. When did this start and why did it stop? Is there a spider assassin union? 
 
1:15:46 that’s it Quarrel is skitzo. there is no way that’s a ‘dragon.’ he probable thinks Bond is the candy king here to save him from the spider assassin guild. 
 
1:17:00 Goodbye Quarrel. You were a coward and a bad stereo type but we’ll miss you calling everyone captian. 
 
1:18:50 this is one chick short of a fetish video. “Yes unradiate me more big boy.” 
 
1:20:00 how did this get a pg rating. they practically just showed her naked. 
 
1:21:45 these are the nicest henchwomen ever. there’s even a mint on my bed. that’s so sweet of them. I’m leaving a tip i don’t care if it’s frowned upon 
 
1:22:57 You’re in a cell Bond. To not think the place is ‘wired for sound’ would make you stupid. wait a second this is James “Punch first’ Bond. Never mind. 
 
1:23:50 so what was the purpose of drugging them. no seriously it never comes up and they just wake up the next day.  
 
1:27:00 Welcome to this episode of MtV cribs were we check out Dr. No’s amazing pad. He’s so gangsta. 
 
1:28:18 No really he is gangsta.  
 
1:29:24 Atomic Power. ONly the fifties and sixties ever used that phrase.  
 
1:30:58  at this point you really do realize that HOney rider really is nothing but eye candy here. the filmmakers literally just dragged her out of the film. 
 
1:34:43 Oh look a man sized air vent in a prison cell. There is absolutely no way anyone would ever ever try to escape through there. it would be too easy. 
 
1:35:50 “Come on out, have a few laughs” 
 
1:37:00 Are these air vents or water vents. Did some one put freddy on the switch again? Goddamn it guys he falls asleep every shift you can’t do that. No, no, no I”ll fix it you keep having your tunafish sandwich. Do you really want Dr. NO down here again crushing things at us. Once he starts he’ll keep going for hours. 
 
1:39:10 Someone needs to tell me if that’s a pink hazmat suit or not. because if it is i’m laughing my ass off. 
 
1:40:19 “Danger Level” so does the arrow point at where the danger level is than? I’m unclear. Can you make the red arrow larger? It would be a great help. 
 
1:41:29 he hasn’t stop cranking that thing. and his suit is filled with air maybe he dreamt of being the stay puft marshmellow man one night and started having fetish thoughts while at his post at the ‘danger level’ crank station. 
 
1:43:00 You know i just realize that I never understood Dr. No’s evil scheme. What is he trying to do here? Blow something up? Sabatoge a rocket launch? He has a gaint glowing orb so is it word domination?  
 
1:44:50 And the Doc goes out like a bitch. And all because he didn’t have fingers. HOw sad. 
 
1:45:45 Sean Connery is channeling his inner William Shatner here. 
 
1:46:21 So were each of those rooms elaborate death traps? Was this a hobby of Dr. NO’s? He just liked building death traps since the tragic loss of his hands. It was either that or start drinking again. 
 
1:48:00 they weren’t out of fuel he just wanted to bang her that evil ass bastard. Seriously Bond’s cock should be liscensed as a lethal weapon 
 
1:49:10 and bonds first film ends with him banging a chick for the second time in a day. way to have goals dude. 
 
And that ends the first live blog event. That was actually kind of fun, and please leave comments. Tommorrow some time after seven I’ll be doing From Russia with Love, so try to be here for that.  Good night, I’m out *drops mic*

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0 Notes

BBC says MI5 suspected 007 screenwriter of being a Communist agent

Wolf Mankowitz has only one official 007 screenwriting credit but his influence extends beyond that. Anyway, the writer was monitored by the U.K.’s MI5, which suspected Mankowitz of being a Commnist agent, the BBC reported this week, citing newly released government records.

You can read the full story BY CLICKING HERE. Here’s a brief excerpt:

Born in London’s East End, Mr Mankowitz attended the University of Cambridge where he joined the university’s Socialist Society and met his wife Ann, a Communist Party member.

MI5 first became interested in Mr Mankowitz in 1944, when the couple were living in Newcastle.

Mankowitz is one of the credited screewriters of producer Charles K. Feldman’s 1967 spoof version of Casino Royale. But a few years earlier, he introduced Harry Saltzman, who held an option on Ian Fleming’s 007 novels that was running out, with Albert R. Broccoli. That fateful meeting resulted in the 1961 formation of Eon Productions, the company that produces the official Bond film series.

Mankowitz worked on the new company’s first project, Dr. No, along with Richard Maibaum but, according to the documentary Inside Dr. No, pulled out, fearing the project would be a disaster.

Also, according to film historian Adrian Turner’s 1998 book on Goldfinger, Mankowitz sold Saltzman an idea that was incorporated in to that 1964 film. Turner quotes Mankowitz as saying he came up with the idea of having a Mafia chief put into the trunk of a car that would be run a car crushing machine. The price: 500 British pounds.

Also, here’s a shoutout to Jeremy Duns, author of the spy novel Free Country, from whom we learned of the BBC story on Mankowitz.

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3 Notes

fuckyeahdoubleohseven:

James Bond: Now, don’t worry, Quarrel. Everything’s going to be fine.
Quarrel: You say so, Captain. Bottom part of where my belly used to be tells me different.
James Bond: For me, Crab Key’s going to be a gentle relaxation.
Felix Leiter: From what? Dames?
James Bond: No, from being a clay pigeon.

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0 Notes

literarybond:

Time for another author side-by-side: this time, it’s Ian Fleming and Noel Coward — Coward on the left, and Fleming (in a portrait drawn by Coward), on the right.
I absolutely love Noel Coward (especially his plays Private Lives and Blithe Spirit), but comparing his writing style to Fleming’s seems a little like comparing Tony Kushner to Tom Clancy. Fleming’s books are driven by plot and the sheer magnetism of his leading man. Coward’s plays and short stories sparkle with dialogue: lots of well-dressed ladies and gentlemen drinking cocktails and lobbing bitchy witticisms at one another. Coward’s The Wooden Madonna is the closest thing I can think of to a Bond-type story (intrigue, exotic locales, espionage), which is in a terrific short story collection called To Step Aside.
Though one wrote thrillers and one wrote plays, Fleming and Coward were great friends in real life. Coward was a witness to Fleming’s marriage to Ann Rothemere in 1952. In Jamaica, they were neighbours — Coward first fell in love with the island while staying at Goldeneye, Fleming’s estate. He bought his own property, Blue Harbour, just a few miles up the beach from Goldeneye.
In addition to being a playwright and composer, Coward was also an actor. It seems incredible, but Coward was actually Fleming’s first choice to play metal-handed Julius No in 1962’s Dr. No (the role went to Joseph Wiseman instead). Coward turned down the role via telegram, writing:

Dr. No? No! No! No!

literarybond:

Time for another author side-by-side: this time, it’s Ian Fleming and Noel Coward — Coward on the left, and Fleming (in a portrait drawn by Coward), on the right.

I absolutely love Noel Coward (especially his plays Private Lives and Blithe Spirit), but comparing his writing style to Fleming’s seems a little like comparing Tony Kushner to Tom Clancy. Fleming’s books are driven by plot and the sheer magnetism of his leading man. Coward’s plays and short stories sparkle with dialogue: lots of well-dressed ladies and gentlemen drinking cocktails and lobbing bitchy witticisms at one another. Coward’s The Wooden Madonna is the closest thing I can think of to a Bond-type story (intrigue, exotic locales, espionage), which is in a terrific short story collection called To Step Aside.

Though one wrote thrillers and one wrote plays, Fleming and Coward were great friends in real life. Coward was a witness to Fleming’s marriage to Ann Rothemere in 1952. In Jamaica, they were neighbours — Coward first fell in love with the island while staying at Goldeneye, Fleming’s estate. He bought his own property, Blue Harbour, just a few miles up the beach from Goldeneye.

In addition to being a playwright and composer, Coward was also an actor. It seems incredible, but Coward was actually Fleming’s first choice to play metal-handed Julius No in 1962’s Dr. No (the role went to Joseph Wiseman instead). Coward turned down the role via telegram, writing:

Dr. No? No! No! No!

Filed in ian fleming james bond stories behind dr. no noel coward

2 Notes

Miss Taro - The Character in the Movie

In the 1962 James Bond movie Dr. No, Miss Taro worked as a  secretary for Pleydell-Smith at Government house in Kingston, Jamaica.  She also worked for Dr. No and  reported to him that James Bond was coming over to investigate the death  of John  Strangways, the head of station in Jamaica. Bond was the only one  who realized her connection with Dr. No and he even caught her spying on  a conversation through a keyhole.
Miss Taro invited Bond to her house for dinner, something that didn’t  happen in the novel. It was,  of course,  a trap and three of Dr. No’s  henchmen came after bond in a hearse. Bond managed to loose them,  sending them flying down a cliff, and drove on to Miss Taro’s house. She  was surprised to see him and soon after got a call from another of Dr.  No’s henchmen Professor  Dent. Miss Taro said that Bond was there and she was told to keep  him there so he could be assassinated later on.
She kept Bond there and said she would make a Chinese. Bond lied,  saying he fancied something else and that he would call a cab. He had  actually called Government House and when Miss Taro got in the car, she  realized she was being arrested and spat in Bond’s face. Bond stayed to  wait for Professor Dent and Miss Taro was presumably sent to jail or to  be interrogated.

The Character in the Book

Miss Taro is a fictional character who appeared in Ian Fleming’s  novel Dr. No, published in 1958. She was a Chinese woman who  worked in Jamaica as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith, who in turn worked  for the British Secret Service as Principal Secretary at Government  House in Kingston, Jamaica.
Off the coast of Jamaica was a small island named Crab Key. It was  owned by Dr. No, who was using a powerful radio beam to takeover the  guidance systems of USA test missiles so he could crash land them. Miss  Taro reported back any information that may concern him or his island.  She looked through Bond’s file and reported that a British Spy was  coming to Investigate. Bond discovered this when he found his folder  open on her desk. She also stole the files on Crab Key to deter anyone  from investigating. Unlike the movie, Miss Taro doesn’t appear again  after Bond’s meeting with Pleydell-Smith.

from Miss Taro @ 007 James

Miss Taro - The Character in the Movie

In the 1962 James Bond movie Dr. No, Miss Taro worked as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith at Government house in Kingston, Jamaica. She also worked for Dr. No and reported to him that James Bond was coming over to investigate the death of John Strangways, the head of station in Jamaica. Bond was the only one who realized her connection with Dr. No and he even caught her spying on a conversation through a keyhole.

Miss Taro invited Bond to her house for dinner, something that didn’t happen in the novel. It was, of course, a trap and three of Dr. No’s henchmen came after bond in a hearse. Bond managed to loose them, sending them flying down a cliff, and drove on to Miss Taro’s house. She was surprised to see him and soon after got a call from another of Dr. No’s henchmen Professor Dent. Miss Taro said that Bond was there and she was told to keep him there so he could be assassinated later on.

She kept Bond there and said she would make a Chinese. Bond lied, saying he fancied something else and that he would call a cab. He had actually called Government House and when Miss Taro got in the car, she realized she was being arrested and spat in Bond’s face. Bond stayed to wait for Professor Dent and Miss Taro was presumably sent to jail or to be interrogated.

The Character in the Book

Miss Taro is a fictional character who appeared in Ian Fleming’s novel Dr. No, published in 1958. She was a Chinese woman who worked in Jamaica as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith, who in turn worked for the British Secret Service as Principal Secretary at Government House in Kingston, Jamaica.

Off the coast of Jamaica was a small island named Crab Key. It was owned by Dr. No, who was using a powerful radio beam to takeover the guidance systems of USA test missiles so he could crash land them. Miss Taro reported back any information that may concern him or his island. She looked through Bond’s file and reported that a British Spy was coming to Investigate. Bond discovered this when he found his folder open on her desk. She also stole the files on Crab Key to deter anyone from investigating. Unlike the movie, Miss Taro doesn’t appear again after Bond’s meeting with Pleydell-Smith.

from Miss Taro @ 007 James

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