My name is Bond. James Bond.

about cinematic 007

All posts tagged on her majesty's secret service

2 Notes

Who Would Be James Bond?
In the early  ’60s, movie producers adapting Ian Fleming’s novels about a suave  British spy named James Bond plucked a relative unknown, Sean Connery,  out of obscurity and offered him the role of a lifetime. And when  Connery left the franchise after five movies, the hunt for Bond was on  again. LIFE sent photographer Loomis Dean to the final casting sessions  for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (released 40 years ago this  week), and the magazine published a handful of those photos. But some of  the choicest frames — Bond wannabes suiting up, holding guns, drinking  martinis, wooing women — have never been seen…until now. Meet each of  the five top candidates (including ultimate choice George Lazenby,  bottom right in this composite image), and check out their best moves.
read more on Life.com: Exclusive UNPUBLISHED: James  Bond Auditions

Who Would Be James Bond?

In the early ’60s, movie producers adapting Ian Fleming’s novels about a suave British spy named James Bond plucked a relative unknown, Sean Connery, out of obscurity and offered him the role of a lifetime. And when Connery left the franchise after five movies, the hunt for Bond was on again. LIFE sent photographer Loomis Dean to the final casting sessions for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (released 40 years ago this week), and the magazine published a handful of those photos. But some of the choicest frames — Bond wannabes suiting up, holding guns, drinking martinis, wooing women — have never been seen…until now. Meet each of the five top candidates (including ultimate choice George Lazenby, bottom right in this composite image), and check out their best moves.

read more on Life.com: Exclusive UNPUBLISHED: James Bond Auditions

Filed in LIFE george lazenby james bond stories behind on her majesty's secret service

4 Notes

Lois Maxwell (1927-2007)

She originated the role of Miss Moneypenny in the James Bond franchise, playing  the character in fourteen films, from Dr. No (1962) until her final performance of the  character in A View to a Kill (1985).
Maxwell lobbied for the role in James Bond, as her husband had had a  heart attack and they needed the money. Director Terence Young, who once had turned  her down on the grounds that she looked like she “smelled of soap”,  offered her either Moneypenny or the recurring Bond girlfriend, Sylvia  Trench, but she was uncomfortable with a revealing scene the latter  had in the screenplay. The role as M’s secretary guaranteed just two days’ work at ₤100 per day;  Maxwell supplied her own clothes. The Trench character, however, was eliminated after From Russia With Love.
In 1967, Maxwell angered Sean  Connery for a time by appearing in the Italian spy spoof Operation Kid Brother with the star’s brother Neil Connery and Bernard  Lee. In 1971, Maxwell was nearly replaced for Diamonds Are Forever after  demanding a pay raise; her policewoman’s cap disguises hair she had  already dyed for another role. In 1975, she plays Moneypenny weeping for the death of James Bond in a  short scene with Bernard Lee as M in the French comedy Bons baisers de Hong Kong. For  the filming of A View to a Kill, her final appearance, Bond producer Cubby Broccoli told her that the two  of them were the only ones from Dr. No still working on the series. Maxwell asked that  her character be killed off, but Broccoli recast the role instead. She was succeeded by Caroline Bliss and later Samantha  Bond.
As Moneypenny, according to author Tom Lisanti, she was seen as an  “anchor”, with her flirtatious repartee with Bond lending the films realism and humanism.  For Moneypenny, Bond was “unobtainable”, freeing the characters to make  outrageous sexual double entendres. At the same time, her character did  little to imbue the series with changing feminist notions.
Although she is world famous for this role, her total screen time as  Moneypenny in 14 films was less than twenty minutes, and she spoke fewer  than 200 words.

from her Wikipedia page
// her filmography on IMDb
// Miss Moneypenny’s Wikipedia page

Lois Maxwell (1927-2007)

She originated the role of Miss Moneypenny in the James Bond franchise, playing the character in fourteen films, from Dr. No (1962) until her final performance of the character in A View to a Kill (1985).

Maxwell lobbied for the role in James Bond, as her husband had had a heart attack and they needed the money. Director Terence Young, who once had turned her down on the grounds that she looked like she “smelled of soap”, offered her either Moneypenny or the recurring Bond girlfriend, Sylvia Trench, but she was uncomfortable with a revealing scene the latter had in the screenplay. The role as M’s secretary guaranteed just two days’ work at ₤100 per day; Maxwell supplied her own clothes. The Trench character, however, was eliminated after From Russia With Love.

In 1967, Maxwell angered Sean Connery for a time by appearing in the Italian spy spoof Operation Kid Brother with the star’s brother Neil Connery and Bernard Lee. In 1971, Maxwell was nearly replaced for Diamonds Are Forever after demanding a pay raise; her policewoman’s cap disguises hair she had already dyed for another role. In 1975, she plays Moneypenny weeping for the death of James Bond in a short scene with Bernard Lee as M in the French comedy Bons baisers de Hong Kong. For the filming of A View to a Kill, her final appearance, Bond producer Cubby Broccoli told her that the two of them were the only ones from Dr. No still working on the series. Maxwell asked that her character be killed off, but Broccoli recast the role instead. She was succeeded by Caroline Bliss and later Samantha Bond.

As Moneypenny, according to author Tom Lisanti, she was seen as an “anchor”, with her flirtatious repartee with Bond lending the films realism and humanism. For Moneypenny, Bond was “unobtainable”, freeing the characters to make outrageous sexual double entendres. At the same time, her character did little to imbue the series with changing feminist notions.

Although she is world famous for this role, her total screen time as Moneypenny in 14 films was less than twenty minutes, and she spoke fewer than 200 words.

from her Wikipedia page

// her filmography on IMDb

// Miss Moneypenny’s Wikipedia page

Filed in lois maxwell 1962 james bond sean connery dr. no from russia with love goldfinger thunderball you only live twice on her majesty's secret service diamonds are forever live and let die the man with the golden gun the spy who loved me moonraker for your eyes only octopussy a view to a kill miss moneypenny

2 Notes

Bernard Lee (1908-1981)

M played by Bernard Lee appears in eleven James Bond films from Dr No up  to and including Moonraker. In Dr No, M establishes his superiority  over Bond that would last for the next seventeen years.

from James Bond Multimedia: Bernard Lee page

In the Bond films, Lee’s character, M, is Admiral Sir Miles Messervy (only ever named, besides as  ‘M’, as ‘Admiral’ and ‘Miles’ on screen in his appearances), Bond’s  irascible boss who sends him out on assignments. He also portrays M  along with Lois Maxwell as Moneypenny in the 1975 French comedy Bons baisers de Hong Kong. Lee  was succeeded by Robert Brown, though not necessarily  playing the same character (Brown had played another admiral in the  series previously). Judi Dench, a friend of Lee’s, would later take  over the role of a brand-new M, starting in 1995 with some references to  her predecessor, including an oil painting of Lee in the role seen in  MI6’s secondary HQ (a Scottish castle).

from Bernard  Lee’s Wikipedia page

M was played by Bernard Lee from the first Bond movie, Dr. No, until Moonraker (1979). Lee died of cancer in  January 1981, four months after the filming of For Your Eyes Only began. He  had been too ill to appear in the film (which was released later in  1981), and the character was written out of it, with his lines given to  either his Chief of Staff or the Minister of Defence, Sir Fredrick Gray.
In the first Bond film, Dr. No, M boasts about his ability to  reduce the number of operative casualties since taking the job, implying  someone else held the job recently before him. In the earlier films, he  has Bond’s field equipment replaced by newer devices, such as replacing  his Beretta  with a Walther PPK and his Bentley  with an Aston Martin DB5. Ian Fleming made a  reference to a predecessor by stating in The Man with the Golden Gun “My predecessor died in that chair.” Gardner also makes references to  M’s predecessors in Scorpius, again suggesting that Messervy is not the  first. Also, in the film version of Dr. No, M is heard to call  himself head of MI7  which actually was the department in charge of propaganda and  censorship (the actor originally said MI6, but for reasons unknown was  overdubbed with the no-longer-extant MI7 prior to the film’s release,  the DVD subtitles also state that M is head of MI6); this contradicts  later films that state he is in charge of MI6. Curiously, earlier in the  film, the department was actually referred to as MI6 by a radio  operator. This M refers to Bond by his first name, James, in both The  Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, and is referred to by his first name, Miles, only in The Spy Who Loved Me.

from M (James Bond) Wikipedia page
// Bernard Lee’s filmography on IMDb

Bernard Lee (1908-1981)

M played by Bernard Lee appears in eleven James Bond films from Dr No up to and including Moonraker. In Dr No, M establishes his superiority over Bond that would last for the next seventeen years.

from James Bond Multimedia: Bernard Lee page

In the Bond films, Lee’s character, M, is Admiral Sir Miles Messervy (only ever named, besides as ‘M’, as ‘Admiral’ and ‘Miles’ on screen in his appearances), Bond’s irascible boss who sends him out on assignments. He also portrays M along with Lois Maxwell as Moneypenny in the 1975 French comedy Bons baisers de Hong Kong. Lee was succeeded by Robert Brown, though not necessarily playing the same character (Brown had played another admiral in the series previously). Judi Dench, a friend of Lee’s, would later take over the role of a brand-new M, starting in 1995 with some references to her predecessor, including an oil painting of Lee in the role seen in MI6’s secondary HQ (a Scottish castle).

from Bernard Lee’s Wikipedia page

M was played by Bernard Lee from the first Bond movie, Dr. No, until Moonraker (1979). Lee died of cancer in January 1981, four months after the filming of For Your Eyes Only began. He had been too ill to appear in the film (which was released later in 1981), and the character was written out of it, with his lines given to either his Chief of Staff or the Minister of Defence, Sir Fredrick Gray.

In the first Bond film, Dr. No, M boasts about his ability to reduce the number of operative casualties since taking the job, implying someone else held the job recently before him. In the earlier films, he has Bond’s field equipment replaced by newer devices, such as replacing his Beretta with a Walther PPK and his Bentley with an Aston Martin DB5. Ian Fleming made a reference to a predecessor by stating in The Man with the Golden Gun “My predecessor died in that chair.” Gardner also makes references to M’s predecessors in Scorpius, again suggesting that Messervy is not the first. Also, in the film version of Dr. No, M is heard to call himself head of MI7 which actually was the department in charge of propaganda and censorship (the actor originally said MI6, but for reasons unknown was overdubbed with the no-longer-extant MI7 prior to the film’s release, the DVD subtitles also state that M is head of MI6); this contradicts later films that state he is in charge of MI6. Curiously, earlier in the film, the department was actually referred to as MI6 by a radio operator. This M refers to Bond by his first name, James, in both The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, and is referred to by his first name, Miles, only in The Spy Who Loved Me.

from M (James Bond) Wikipedia page

// Bernard Lee’s filmography on IMDb

Filed in 1962 dr. no james bond M bernard lee from russia with love goldfinger thunderball you only live twice on her majesty's secret service diamonds are forever live and let die the man with the golden gun the spy who loved me moonraker

2 Notes

Universal Exports entrance from James Bond Logos

Universal Exports is used as a cover name for the British Secret Service  in the films.  It has been featured repeatedly in the films in various ways such as a  direction sign in Dr. No, the abbreviation “UnivEx” in From  Russia with Love, a brass name plate in On Her Majesty’s Secret  Service, Bond’s helicopter in For Your Eyes Only, a building  with a sign in The Living Daylights, an identity card in The  World Is Not Enough, a folder in Casino Royale, and a  business card in Quantum of Solace. Bond has also given his  introductions as a Universal Exports employee in You Only Live Twice,  Octopussy, Licence to Kill, The World Is Not Enough,  and Die Another Day.

from Wikipedia

Universal Exports entrance from James Bond Logos

Universal Exports is used as a cover name for the British Secret Service in the films. It has been featured repeatedly in the films in various ways such as a direction sign in Dr. No, the abbreviation “UnivEx” in From Russia with Love, a brass name plate in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, Bond’s helicopter in For Your Eyes Only, a building with a sign in The Living Daylights, an identity card in The World Is Not Enough, a folder in Casino Royale, and a business card in Quantum of Solace. Bond has also given his introductions as a Universal Exports employee in You Only Live Twice, Octopussy, Licence to Kill, The World Is Not Enough, and Die Another Day.

from Wikipedia

Filed in 1962 casino royale die another day dr. no for your eyes only from russia with love james bond licence to kill octopussy on her majesty's secret service quantum of solace sean connery the living daylights the world is not enough universal exports you only live twice logos

8 Notes


Baccarat chemin-de-fer is the favoured game of Ian  Fleming’s secret agent creation, James  Bond.  He can be seen playing the game in numerous novels – most notably 007’s  1953 debut, Casino Royale, in which the entire  plot revolves around a game between Bond and SMERSH operative Le  Chiffre (the unabridged version of the novel includes a primer to  the game for readers who are unfamiliar with it). It is also featured in  several filmed versions of the novels, including Dr. No,  where Bond is first introduced playing the game; Thunderball; the 1967 version of Casino Royale (which is the  most detailed treatment of a baccarat game in any Bond film); On Her Majesty’s Secret  Service; For Your Eyes Only; and GoldenEye.
In the 2006 new movie adaptation of Casino  Royale, however, Baccarat is replaced by Texas hold ‘em poker largely due to its great popularity at the time  of filming.

Chemin de Fer - french baccarat

This was the original version of Baccarat when it was introduced to  France and is still the version that is popular there. The name “Chemin  de Fer” (railroad) came about because the cards were placed in an iron box.
Six decks of cards are used, shuffled together. Players are seated in random  order, typically around an oval table; discarded cards go to the center.  Play begins to the right of the croupier  and continues counterclockwise. At the start of the game, the croupier  and then all players shuffle the cards in play order. The croupier  shuffles a final time and the player to his left cuts the deck.
…

read more on Wikipedia
// or Casino Top 10: James Bond - Chemin de Fer (Baccarat)

Baccarat chemin-de-fer is the favoured game of Ian Fleming’s secret agent creation, James Bond. He can be seen playing the game in numerous novels – most notably 007’s 1953 debut, Casino Royale, in which the entire plot revolves around a game between Bond and SMERSH operative Le Chiffre (the unabridged version of the novel includes a primer to the game for readers who are unfamiliar with it). It is also featured in several filmed versions of the novels, including Dr. No, where Bond is first introduced playing the game; Thunderball; the 1967 version of Casino Royale (which is the most detailed treatment of a baccarat game in any Bond film); On Her Majesty’s Secret Service; For Your Eyes Only; and GoldenEye.

In the 2006 new movie adaptation of Casino Royale, however, Baccarat is replaced by Texas hold ‘em poker largely due to its great popularity at the time of filming.

Chemin de Fer - french baccarat

This was the original version of Baccarat when it was introduced to France and is still the version that is popular there. The name “Chemin de Fer” (railroad) came about because the cards were placed in an iron box.

Six decks of cards are used, shuffled together. Players are seated in random order, typically around an oval table; discarded cards go to the center. Play begins to the right of the croupier and continues counterclockwise. At the start of the game, the croupier and then all players shuffle the cards in play order. The croupier shuffles a final time and the player to his left cuts the deck.

read more on Wikipedia

// or Casino Top 10: James Bond - Chemin de Fer (Baccarat)

Filed in james bond sean connery 1962 dr. no chemin de fer ian fleming le chiffre casino royale thunderball on her majesty's secret service for your eyes only goldeneye texas hold' em