My name is Bond. James Bond.

about cinematic 007

All posts tagged stories behind

7 Notes

Film 007′s upcoming 50th anniversary: what was going on in 1962, anyway?

Quite a lot, as it turns out.

Next year is the golden anniversary of the first 007 film, Dr. No, and Variety has reported that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is “working up plans for a 2012 yearlong commemoration.” That got us to thinking about what was going on in the world in 1962, which quite a newsy year in a variety of ways.

Here are some examples of well-known, and lesser-known, events that year:

Jan. 15: NBC airs “La Strega” episode of Thriller, starring Ursula Andress, female lead of Dr. No, which will be the first James Bond film.

Jan 16: Production begins on Dr. No, modestly budgeted at about $1 million. Fees include $40,000 for director Terence Young and $80,000 each for producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, not counting their share of profits. (Figures from resarch by film historian Adrian Turner). Star Sean Connery tells Playboy magazine in 1965 that he was paid $16,800 for Dr. No.

Inside Dr. No, a documentary made by John Cork for a DVD release of the movie, says about 10 percent of the film’s budget went to the Ken Adam-designed reactor room set, where the climatic fight between Bond and Dr. No takes place. (Date of production start from research by Craig Henderson’s For Your Eyes Only Web site.

Jan. 17: Jim Carrey is born.

Feb 3: U.S. begins embargo against Cuba.

Feb. 20: John Glenn becomes first U.S. astronaut to orbit the Earth.

March 2: Wilt Chamberlain scores 100 points as his Philadelphia Warriors team defeats the New York Knicks 169-147 in a game played in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Chamberlain achieves the feat by scoring 36 baskets and, perhaps most amazingly, by hitting 28 of 32 free-throw attempts. (Chamberlain was a notoriously bad free-throw shooter.) The player averaged 50.4 points per game in the 1961-62 season.

April 16: The Spy Who Loved Me, Ian Fleming’s latest 007 novel, is published. The novel takes a radical departure from previous Bond novels. The story is told in the first person by a female character, Vivienne Michel, with Bond not appearing until two-thirds of the way through the story. Fleming, in his dealings with Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, specifies only the title is to be used for any movie. Broccoli (after Saltzman departs the film series) does just that in the 10th film of the 007 series, which comes out in July 1977.

May (publication date, actual likely earlier): The Incredible Hulk, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, debuts in the first issue of his own comic book.

June 1: Nazi Adolph Eichmann executed in Israel.

July 3: Future Mission: Impossible movie star Tom Cruise is born.

July 12: Rolling Stones debut in London.

August (publication date actual date probably earlier): Amazing Fantasy No. 15 published, debut of Spider-Man by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, with cover by Jack Kirby and Ditko.

Aug. 5: Actress Marilyn Monroe dies.

Aug. 6: Michelle Yeoh, who will play Chinese secret agent Wai Lin in the 1997 Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies, is born.

Aug. 16: Future Get Smart movie star Steve Carell is born.

Aug. 16: Ringo Starr joins the Beatles.

Sept. 26: The Beverly Hillbillies debuts on CBS. In a later season, Jethro sees Goldfinger in a movie theater and decides that being a “Double-Naught” spy is his life’s calling.

Oct. 1: Federal marshals escort James Meredith, first African American student at the University of Missippi, as he registers at the school.

Oct. 1: Johnny Carson, a few weeks short of his 37th birthday, hosts his first installment of The Tonight Show. He will remain as host until May 1992. At one point during Carson’s run on the show, he and Sean Connery reference how Carson’s debut on Tonight and Connery’s debut as Bond occurred at around the same time.

Oct. 5: Dr. No has its world premier in London. The film won’t be shown in the U.S. until the following year.

Oct. 14: A U.S. U-2 spy plane discovers missile sites in Cuba, beginning the Cuban Missile Crisis. The crisis will bring the U.S. and Soviet Union to the brink of World War III.

Oct. 22: President John F. Kennedy makes a televised address, publicly revealing the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba.

Oct. 28: Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev announces the U.S.S.R. is removing its missiles from Cuba. (for a more detailed timeline of these events, CLICK HERE.)

Oct. 29: Ian Fleming begins three days of meetings with television producer Norman Felton concerning a show that will eventually be known as The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (source: Craig Henderson) Fleming’s main contribution of the meetings is that the hero should be named Napoleon Solo.

Nov. 7: Richard Nixon loses race for governor of California, tells reporters “you won’t have Dick Nixon to kick around anymore.” He’ll be back.

Dec. 10: The David Lean-directed Lawrence of Arabia has its world premiere in London. The film’s crew include director of photography Freddie Young and camera operator Ernest Day, who will work on future James Bond movies. Young will photograph 1967′s You Only Live Twice. Day would be second unit director (with John Glen) on The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker.

For a more comprehensive list of significant 1962 events, CLICK HERE.

Filed in 1962 dr. no james bond stories behind

7 Notes

nerdsrocket:

A woman in the James Bond film For Your Eyes Only used to be a man. That’s right - one of the Bond girls used to be a man! Carolyn Cossey began her life with the name Barry until deciding to get a sex change in 1972. This required female hormone pills, breast augmentation, and surgery to alter her “plumbing.” For nearly a decade after the procedure, she worked as a model under the name “Tula.” In 1980 Carolyn caught a big break when she was cast in the new James Bond film. Shortly after the movie was released, a British tabloid exposed her as a transsexual, which derailed her modeling and acting career. You can still catch her in a brief moment in the Bond film, though! She is one of ten actresses credited as “girl at pool”. Happy hunting! (source) - OMG Facts - Your Mind. Blown.

nerdsrocket:

A woman in the James Bond film For Your Eyes Only used to be a man. That’s right - one of the Bond girls used to be a man! Carolyn Cossey began her life with the name Barry until deciding to get a sex change in 1972. This required female hormone pills, breast augmentation, and surgery to alter her “plumbing.” For nearly a decade after the procedure, she worked as a model under the name “Tula.” In 1980 Carolyn caught a big break when she was cast in the new James Bond film. Shortly after the movie was released, a British tabloid exposed her as a transsexual, which derailed her modeling and acting career. You can still catch her in a brief moment in the Bond film, though! She is one of ten actresses credited as “girl at pool”. Happy hunting! (source) - OMG Facts - Your Mind. Blown.

Filed in james bond stories behind for your eyes only

0 Notes

BBC says MI5 suspected 007 screenwriter of being a Communist agent

Wolf Mankowitz has only one official 007 screenwriting credit but his influence extends beyond that. Anyway, the writer was monitored by the U.K.’s MI5, which suspected Mankowitz of being a Commnist agent, the BBC reported this week, citing newly released government records.

You can read the full story BY CLICKING HERE. Here’s a brief excerpt:

Born in London’s East End, Mr Mankowitz attended the University of Cambridge where he joined the university’s Socialist Society and met his wife Ann, a Communist Party member.

MI5 first became interested in Mr Mankowitz in 1944, when the couple were living in Newcastle.

Mankowitz is one of the credited screewriters of producer Charles K. Feldman’s 1967 spoof version of Casino Royale. But a few years earlier, he introduced Harry Saltzman, who held an option on Ian Fleming’s 007 novels that was running out, with Albert R. Broccoli. That fateful meeting resulted in the 1961 formation of Eon Productions, the company that produces the official Bond film series.

Mankowitz worked on the new company’s first project, Dr. No, along with Richard Maibaum but, according to the documentary Inside Dr. No, pulled out, fearing the project would be a disaster.

Also, according to film historian Adrian Turner’s 1998 book on Goldfinger, Mankowitz sold Saltzman an idea that was incorporated in to that 1964 film. Turner quotes Mankowitz as saying he came up with the idea of having a Mafia chief put into the trunk of a car that would be run a car crushing machine. The price: 500 British pounds.

Also, here’s a shoutout to Jeremy Duns, author of the spy novel Free Country, from whom we learned of the BBC story on Mankowitz.

Filed in stories behind james bond dr. no wolf mankowitz

0 Notes

literarybond:

Time for another author side-by-side: this time, it’s Ian Fleming and Noel Coward — Coward on the left, and Fleming (in a portrait drawn by Coward), on the right.
I absolutely love Noel Coward (especially his plays Private Lives and Blithe Spirit), but comparing his writing style to Fleming’s seems a little like comparing Tony Kushner to Tom Clancy. Fleming’s books are driven by plot and the sheer magnetism of his leading man. Coward’s plays and short stories sparkle with dialogue: lots of well-dressed ladies and gentlemen drinking cocktails and lobbing bitchy witticisms at one another. Coward’s The Wooden Madonna is the closest thing I can think of to a Bond-type story (intrigue, exotic locales, espionage), which is in a terrific short story collection called To Step Aside.
Though one wrote thrillers and one wrote plays, Fleming and Coward were great friends in real life. Coward was a witness to Fleming’s marriage to Ann Rothemere in 1952. In Jamaica, they were neighbours — Coward first fell in love with the island while staying at Goldeneye, Fleming’s estate. He bought his own property, Blue Harbour, just a few miles up the beach from Goldeneye.
In addition to being a playwright and composer, Coward was also an actor. It seems incredible, but Coward was actually Fleming’s first choice to play metal-handed Julius No in 1962’s Dr. No (the role went to Joseph Wiseman instead). Coward turned down the role via telegram, writing:

Dr. No? No! No! No!

literarybond:

Time for another author side-by-side: this time, it’s Ian Fleming and Noel Coward — Coward on the left, and Fleming (in a portrait drawn by Coward), on the right.

I absolutely love Noel Coward (especially his plays Private Lives and Blithe Spirit), but comparing his writing style to Fleming’s seems a little like comparing Tony Kushner to Tom Clancy. Fleming’s books are driven by plot and the sheer magnetism of his leading man. Coward’s plays and short stories sparkle with dialogue: lots of well-dressed ladies and gentlemen drinking cocktails and lobbing bitchy witticisms at one another. Coward’s The Wooden Madonna is the closest thing I can think of to a Bond-type story (intrigue, exotic locales, espionage), which is in a terrific short story collection called To Step Aside.

Though one wrote thrillers and one wrote plays, Fleming and Coward were great friends in real life. Coward was a witness to Fleming’s marriage to Ann Rothemere in 1952. In Jamaica, they were neighbours — Coward first fell in love with the island while staying at Goldeneye, Fleming’s estate. He bought his own property, Blue Harbour, just a few miles up the beach from Goldeneye.

In addition to being a playwright and composer, Coward was also an actor. It seems incredible, but Coward was actually Fleming’s first choice to play metal-handed Julius No in 1962’s Dr. No (the role went to Joseph Wiseman instead). Coward turned down the role via telegram, writing:

Dr. No? No! No! No!

Filed in ian fleming james bond stories behind dr. no noel coward

7 Notes

mangoprojects:

JAMES BOND DR. NO
Behind the Scenes: Dr. No Part 1 
From MGM, a documentary of an inside look at Ian Fleming’s Dr. No. This part one of four series narrated by Patrick Macnee takes viewers on a journery of the history of Ian Fleming’s James Bond.

Ian Fleming’s Dr. No was written by Ian Fleming, Richard Maibaum, Johanna Harwood, Berkely Mather and Terence Young. Dr. No was directed by Terence Young and starring Sean Connery as Mr. James Bond, Ursula Andress, Jack Lord, Bernard Lee and Joseph Wiseman as Dr. No..permalink

BehindCurtain1

Filed in james bond dr. no 1962 stories behind terence young video

4 Notes

Who Would Be James Bond?
In the early  ’60s, movie producers adapting Ian Fleming’s novels about a suave  British spy named James Bond plucked a relative unknown, Sean Connery,  out of obscurity and offered him the role of a lifetime. And when  Connery left the franchise after five movies, the hunt for Bond was on  again. LIFE sent photographer Loomis Dean to the final casting sessions  for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (released 40 years ago this  week), and the magazine published a handful of those photos. But some of  the choicest frames — Bond wannabes suiting up, holding guns, drinking  martinis, wooing women — have never been seen…until now. Meet each of  the five top candidates (including ultimate choice George Lazenby,  bottom right in this composite image), and check out their best moves.
read more on Life.com: Exclusive UNPUBLISHED: James  Bond Auditions

Who Would Be James Bond?

In the early ’60s, movie producers adapting Ian Fleming’s novels about a suave British spy named James Bond plucked a relative unknown, Sean Connery, out of obscurity and offered him the role of a lifetime. And when Connery left the franchise after five movies, the hunt for Bond was on again. LIFE sent photographer Loomis Dean to the final casting sessions for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (released 40 years ago this week), and the magazine published a handful of those photos. But some of the choicest frames — Bond wannabes suiting up, holding guns, drinking martinis, wooing women — have never been seen…until now. Meet each of the five top candidates (including ultimate choice George Lazenby, bottom right in this composite image), and check out their best moves.

read more on Life.com: Exclusive UNPUBLISHED: James Bond Auditions

Filed in LIFE george lazenby james bond stories behind on her majesty's secret service

12 Notes

 Sean  Connery Sleeping in Chair
Actor Sean Connery sleeps on a  lounge chair beside a row of empty Red Stripe beer bottles, possibly in  character for a movie role. Connery played James Bond in Dr. No,  the first of the James Bond 007 movies, which was filmed in Jamaica.
© Bradley Smith / CORBIS

Sean Connery Sleeping in Chair

Actor Sean Connery sleeps on a lounge chair beside a row of empty Red Stripe beer bottles, possibly in character for a movie role. Connery played James Bond in Dr. No, the first of the James Bond 007 movies, which was filmed in Jamaica.

© Bradley Smith / CORBIS

Filed in 1962 dr. no james bond sean connery stories behind

5 Notes

Sean Connery’s early life:

He also took up bodybuilding as a hobby. While his official  website claims he was third in the 1950 Mr.  Universe contest, most sources place him in the 1953 competition,  either third in the Junior class  or failing to place in the Tall Man classification.  One of the other competitors mentioned that auditions were being held  for a production of South Pacific;  Connery landed a small part.

from Sean Connery’s Wikipedia page

Sean Connery’s early life:

He also took up bodybuilding as a hobby. While his official website claims he was third in the 1950 Mr. Universe contest, most sources place him in the 1953 competition, either third in the Junior class or failing to place in the Tall Man classification. One of the other competitors mentioned that auditions were being held for a production of South Pacific; Connery landed a small part.

from Sean Connery’s Wikipedia page

Filed in james bond sean connery stories behind