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All posts tagged villains

7 Notes

Javier Bardem interested in playing Bond 23 villain, LA Times says

The Los Angeles Times, in its Awards Tracker weblog, says Javier Bardem is interested in playing the villain in Bond 23, due out in November 2012. An exerpt:

Oscar nominee Javier Bardem is notoriously difficult when it comes to getting him to commit to a film, but he admits he has just been offered a part that will be hard to turn down.

Bardem recently met with director Sam Mendes to talk about playing the villain in the next James Bond film, temporarily titled “James Bond 23” and set for a Nov. 9, 2012, release.

The actor, who is Oscar-nominated for his lead work in the Spanish-language drama “Biutiful” and who won in 2008 for another villainous role in “No Country for Old Men,” hasn’t said yes to Mendes — yet. He wants to read the screenplay first.

Filed in james bond villains bond 23

4 Notes

Miss Taro - The Character in the Movie

In the 1962 James Bond movie Dr. No, Miss Taro worked as a  secretary for Pleydell-Smith at Government house in Kingston, Jamaica.  She also worked for Dr. No and  reported to him that James Bond was coming over to investigate the death  of John  Strangways, the head of station in Jamaica. Bond was the only one  who realized her connection with Dr. No and he even caught her spying on  a conversation through a keyhole.
Miss Taro invited Bond to her house for dinner, something that didn’t  happen in the novel. It was,  of course,  a trap and three of Dr. No’s  henchmen came after bond in a hearse. Bond managed to loose them,  sending them flying down a cliff, and drove on to Miss Taro’s house. She  was surprised to see him and soon after got a call from another of Dr.  No’s henchmen Professor  Dent. Miss Taro said that Bond was there and she was told to keep  him there so he could be assassinated later on.
She kept Bond there and said she would make a Chinese. Bond lied,  saying he fancied something else and that he would call a cab. He had  actually called Government House and when Miss Taro got in the car, she  realized she was being arrested and spat in Bond’s face. Bond stayed to  wait for Professor Dent and Miss Taro was presumably sent to jail or to  be interrogated.

The Character in the Book

Miss Taro is a fictional character who appeared in Ian Fleming’s  novel Dr. No, published in 1958. She was a Chinese woman who  worked in Jamaica as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith, who in turn worked  for the British Secret Service as Principal Secretary at Government  House in Kingston, Jamaica.
Off the coast of Jamaica was a small island named Crab Key. It was  owned by Dr. No, who was using a powerful radio beam to takeover the  guidance systems of USA test missiles so he could crash land them. Miss  Taro reported back any information that may concern him or his island.  She looked through Bond’s file and reported that a British Spy was  coming to Investigate. Bond discovered this when he found his folder  open on her desk. She also stole the files on Crab Key to deter anyone  from investigating. Unlike the movie, Miss Taro doesn’t appear again  after Bond’s meeting with Pleydell-Smith.

from Miss Taro @ 007 James

Miss Taro - The Character in the Movie

In the 1962 James Bond movie Dr. No, Miss Taro worked as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith at Government house in Kingston, Jamaica. She also worked for Dr. No and reported to him that James Bond was coming over to investigate the death of John Strangways, the head of station in Jamaica. Bond was the only one who realized her connection with Dr. No and he even caught her spying on a conversation through a keyhole.

Miss Taro invited Bond to her house for dinner, something that didn’t happen in the novel. It was, of course, a trap and three of Dr. No’s henchmen came after bond in a hearse. Bond managed to loose them, sending them flying down a cliff, and drove on to Miss Taro’s house. She was surprised to see him and soon after got a call from another of Dr. No’s henchmen Professor Dent. Miss Taro said that Bond was there and she was told to keep him there so he could be assassinated later on.

She kept Bond there and said she would make a Chinese. Bond lied, saying he fancied something else and that he would call a cab. He had actually called Government House and when Miss Taro got in the car, she realized she was being arrested and spat in Bond’s face. Bond stayed to wait for Professor Dent and Miss Taro was presumably sent to jail or to be interrogated.

The Character in the Book

Miss Taro is a fictional character who appeared in Ian Fleming’s novel Dr. No, published in 1958. She was a Chinese woman who worked in Jamaica as a secretary for Pleydell-Smith, who in turn worked for the British Secret Service as Principal Secretary at Government House in Kingston, Jamaica.

Off the coast of Jamaica was a small island named Crab Key. It was owned by Dr. No, who was using a powerful radio beam to takeover the guidance systems of USA test missiles so he could crash land them. Miss Taro reported back any information that may concern him or his island. She looked through Bond’s file and reported that a British Spy was coming to Investigate. Bond discovered this when he found his folder open on her desk. She also stole the files on Crab Key to deter anyone from investigating. Unlike the movie, Miss Taro doesn’t appear again after Bond’s meeting with Pleydell-Smith.

from Miss Taro @ 007 James

Filed in miss taro zena marshall dr. no 1962 sean connery differencies villains

4 Notes

Zena Marshall (1925-2009)

Her exotic looks resulted in her being cast in “ethnic” roles, such as Asian  women, including her role as the Chinese  character Miss Taro, in the first James  Bond film, Dr. No (1962).

from her Wiki page

Marshall shot to fame in the role of Chinese SPECTRE  agent                       Miss Taro in the debut James Bond film “Dr                       No” in October 1962. Although it took a couple                       of years for worldwide audiences to catch on to  the 007                       phenomenon (the film was not released in the USA  until                       May 1963), and thanks to re-releases of the early  films                       when Bondmania struck with “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball”,                       Marshall’s scenes with Sean                       Connery became part of cinema history.  Although not                       the first conquest for Bond, Miss Taro was the  first ‘bad                   girl’ of the series.
Contributing to a DVD commentary many years later, Marshall                 made it clear that she thought the “Dr No” script was  nothing                 special till director Terence Young introduced an  element of                 humour.                 She also remembered that it took three days to shoot her  landmark                 bedroom scene with Connery and that she found it very  difficult               to spit in his face when handed over to the police.

from Miss Taro’s profile @ MI6
// Zena Marshall's profile @ IMDb

Zena Marshall (1925-2009)

Her exotic looks resulted in her being cast in “ethnic” roles, such as Asian women, including her role as the Chinese character Miss Taro, in the first James Bond film, Dr. No (1962).

from her Wiki page

Marshall shot to fame in the role of Chinese SPECTRE agent Miss Taro in the debut James Bond film “Dr No” in October 1962. Although it took a couple of years for worldwide audiences to catch on to the 007 phenomenon (the film was not released in the USA until May 1963), and thanks to re-releases of the early films when Bondmania struck with “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball”, Marshall’s scenes with Sean Connery became part of cinema history. Although not the first conquest for Bond, Miss Taro was the first ‘bad girl’ of the series.

Contributing to a DVD commentary many years later, Marshall made it clear that she thought the “Dr No” script was nothing special till director Terence Young introduced an element of humour. She also remembered that it took three days to shoot her landmark bedroom scene with Connery and that she found it very difficult to spit in his face when handed over to the police.

from Miss Taro’s profile @ MI6

// Zena Marshall's profile @ IMDb

Filed in dr. no james bond 1962 zena marshall miss taro villains

3 Notes

Reggie Carter (?-1995) credited as Reginald Carter
// Reggie Carter’s IMDb profile

Let me have a cigarette.
To hell with you!

from The Internet Movie Transcriptions
Mr Jones played by Reginald Carter is the fourth Villain of Dr. No.  After Bond arrives at Kingston Airport in Jamaica, Mr Jones introduces  himself as Bond’s chauffeur to Government House.
After phoning  Government House to confirm his suspicions, he finds out that no  chauffeur was sent.
Bond plays along with Mr Jones hoping to find  out whom he is working for. On an isolated road Bond confronts Mr Jones,  where after he attempts to reach for a gun, Bond uses his judo skills  to stop him. Bond allows Mr Jones to get a cigarette, but realises too  late that the cigarette contained cyanide killing Mr Jones.
Another operative of Dr. No, Mr Jones  is sent to learn more information about Bond. After Bond defeats Mr  Jones in a short one-sided fight, he tells Bond he will talk. More  extreme than The Photographer, Mr Jones kills himself with cyanide than  tell Bond any information.

from James Bond Multimedia

When fighting with Jones the chauffeur, Bond pulls  back with his right arm and hits him with his left.

from Movie Mistakes in Dr. No @ MI6

Reggie Carter (?-1995) credited as Reginald Carter

// Reggie Carter’s IMDb profile

Let me have a cigarette.

To hell with you!

from The Internet Movie Transcriptions

Mr Jones played by Reginald Carter is the fourth Villain of Dr. No. After Bond arrives at Kingston Airport in Jamaica, Mr Jones introduces himself as Bond’s chauffeur to Government House.

After phoning Government House to confirm his suspicions, he finds out that no chauffeur was sent.

Bond plays along with Mr Jones hoping to find out whom he is working for. On an isolated road Bond confronts Mr Jones, where after he attempts to reach for a gun, Bond uses his judo skills to stop him. Bond allows Mr Jones to get a cigarette, but realises too late that the cigarette contained cyanide killing Mr Jones.

Another operative of Dr. No, Mr Jones is sent to learn more information about Bond. After Bond defeats Mr Jones in a short one-sided fight, he tells Bond he will talk. More extreme than The Photographer, Mr Jones kills himself with cyanide than tell Bond any information.

from James Bond Multimedia

When fighting with Jones the chauffeur, Bond pulls back with his right arm and hits him with his left.

from Movie Mistakes in Dr. No @ MI6

Filed in 1962 4 frames dr. no james bond mistakes mr. jones reginald carter sean connery villains quotes

4 Notes


Mr. Jones (Reginald Carter),  the driver sent by Dr. No, keeps a Browning Hi-Power in the glovebox of his Chevrolet Bel Air  to kill Bond with.

from The Internet Movie Firearms Database

The first version of the classic pistol, developed by John Browning and  adopted by Belgium in 1935, the FN P-35 - 9x19mm.  During World  War II, the Germans would occupy the Belgian firearms factories and  continued to produce this gun, still called the P-35, but with Waffenamt stamps.  The Design would be adopted by other countries and  manufactured abroad with the generic designation simply as the “Browning  High Power”.

from Browning Hi-Power page @ IMFDb

Mr. Jones (Reginald Carter), the driver sent by Dr. No, keeps a Browning Hi-Power in the glovebox of his Chevrolet Bel Air to kill Bond with.

from The Internet Movie Firearms Database

The first version of the classic pistol, developed by John Browning and adopted by Belgium in 1935, the FN P-35 - 9x19mm. During World War II, the Germans would occupy the Belgian firearms factories and continued to produce this gun, still called the P-35, but with Waffenamt stamps. The Design would be adopted by other countries and manufactured abroad with the generic designation simply as the “Browning High Power”.

from Browning Hi-Power page @ IMFDb

Filed in mr. jones dr. no 1962 james bond villains reginald carter firearms

3 Notes

Bond rides in a taxi driven by Mr. Jones which is a second generation black 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air convertible - the first car driven by 007 in a Bond movie.

The Chevrolet Bel Air is a full-size automobile that was produced by the Chevrolet  division of General Motors for the 1950–1975 model years.  From 1950–1952, Hardtops in Chevrolet’s Deluxe Styleline model range  were designated with the Bel Air name, but it was not a distinct series  of its own until the 1953 model year. Bel Air production continued in Canada  for its home market only through the 1981 model year.

from Wikipedia
// List of James Bond vehicles # General Motors

Bond rides in a taxi driven by Mr. Jones which is a second generation black 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air convertible - the first car driven by 007 in a Bond movie.

The Chevrolet Bel Air is a full-size automobile that was produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors for the 1950–1975 model years. From 1950–1952, Hardtops in Chevrolet’s Deluxe Styleline model range were designated with the Bel Air name, but it was not a distinct series of its own until the 1953 model year. Bel Air production continued in Canada for its home market only through the 1981 model year.

from Wikipedia

// List of James Bond vehicles # General Motors

Filed in 1962 cars dr. no james bond mr. jones villains reginald carter sean connery

8 Notes


‘The Three Blind Mice’ are the first Villains of Dr. No. Using the  guise of three blind men (hence the name) these assassins make their way  to the Queens Club where Commander Strangways, a British MI6 agent in  Jamaica, is playing cards.
As Strangways gets into his car ‘The  Three Blind Mice’ assassinate him. They travel to his house where they  proceed to kill his secretary, Miss Trueblood and steal Strangways’  files on Crab Key and Dr. No.
‘The Three Blind Mice’ re-appear a  short time later when Bond travels to meet Miss Taro. During a car chase  to force Bond off the road, his Sunbeam Alpine easily manages to  outmanoeuvre his pursuers hearse.
‘The Three Blind Mice’ are paid  assassins working for Dr. No. After Strangways informs Professor Dent of  his findings on Crab Key, Dent arranges for ‘The Three Blind Mice’ to  kill Strangways and his secretary Miss Trueblood. ‘The Three Blind Mice’  are killed when their plan to force Bond off the road backfires sending  them careering off a cliff to their death.

 from James Bond Multimedia

They never really make an attempt on Bond’s life. They’re waiting  outside of the Bond’s hotel in Jamaica, but as they’re preparing to  shoot Bond, a car drives by and they miss their chance. They also chase  Bond in their car, but that ends with Bond getting away and them getting  an introduction to the bottom of a ravine.
The Three Blind Mice are not mentioned in the film’s opening or end  credits. The name “Three Blind Mice”, comes from the song that plays in  the background when they are first introduced at the beginning of the  film.

 YouTube: Dr. NO - 3 Blind Mice

The opening scenes are in Kingston, Jamaica,  where the ‘three blind mice’ amble through Harbour  Street, downtown. John Strangway is gunned down by the ‘mice’ and  spirited away after a bridge game at the ‘Queens Club’, now the Liguanea Club, 80 Knutsford  Boulevard –  a private sports club and hotel, and also the home  of the Jamaican Squash Association.

from The  Worldwide Guides to Movie Locations
Three Blind Mice walked on Victoria (Crafts) Market
Eric Coverly (1st Beggar)
Charles Edghill (2nd Beggar)
Henry Lopez (3rd Beggar)
Adrian Robinson (Hearse Driver)

‘The Three Blind Mice’ are the first Villains of Dr. No. Using the guise of three blind men (hence the name) these assassins make their way to the Queens Club where Commander Strangways, a British MI6 agent in Jamaica, is playing cards.

As Strangways gets into his car ‘The Three Blind Mice’ assassinate him. They travel to his house where they proceed to kill his secretary, Miss Trueblood and steal Strangways’ files on Crab Key and Dr. No.

‘The Three Blind Mice’ re-appear a short time later when Bond travels to meet Miss Taro. During a car chase to force Bond off the road, his Sunbeam Alpine easily manages to outmanoeuvre his pursuers hearse.

‘The Three Blind Mice’ are paid assassins working for Dr. No. After Strangways informs Professor Dent of his findings on Crab Key, Dent arranges for ‘The Three Blind Mice’ to kill Strangways and his secretary Miss Trueblood. ‘The Three Blind Mice’ are killed when their plan to force Bond off the road backfires sending them careering off a cliff to their death.

from James Bond Multimedia

They never really make an attempt on Bond’s life. They’re waiting outside of the Bond’s hotel in Jamaica, but as they’re preparing to shoot Bond, a car drives by and they miss their chance. They also chase Bond in their car, but that ends with Bond getting away and them getting an introduction to the bottom of a ravine.

The Three Blind Mice are not mentioned in the film’s opening or end credits. The name “Three Blind Mice”, comes from the song that plays in the background when they are first introduced at the beginning of the film.

YouTube: Dr. NO - 3 Blind Mice

The opening scenes are in Kingston, Jamaica, where the ‘three blind mice’ amble through Harbour Street, downtown. John Strangway is gunned down by the ‘mice’ and spirited away after a bridge game at the ‘Queens Club’, now the Liguanea Club, 80 Knutsford Boulevard – a private sports club and hotel, and also the home of the Jamaican Squash Association.

from The Worldwide Guides to Movie Locations

Three Blind Mice walked on Victoria (Crafts) Market

Filed in 1962 adrian robinson charles edghill dr. no eric coverly film locations henry lopez james bond main title mary trueblood professor dent strangways three blind mice villains